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ENGR-1100, Introduction to Engineering Analysis

Offered: Spring 2017
(4 credits)
Course Description: This course provides an integrated treatment of Vector Mechanics (Statics) and Linear Algebra. It also emphasizes matrix methods for solving engineering problems. Students will be expected to learn key principles of Statics and Linear Algebra and to demonstrate skills with vector and matrix manipulations. The objectives of this course are to enable the student to analyze external and internal force systems acting on particles and rigid physical bodies in static equilibrium. The student shall be able to "model" engineering systems by making simplifying assumptions, developing "free-body" diagrams of the physical model, applying the conditions for equilibrium, and utilizing vector and linear algebra methods in their solution. The student shall learn to present problem solutions in a well-organized, neat, and professional manner.

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MANE-2400, Fundamentals of Nuclear Engineering

Offered: Fall 2009-2010, Fall 2012-2016
(4 credits)
Course Description: The broad goal of this course is to provide students with fundamental understanding of nuclear reactor engineering and to build up solid foundations for further nuclear engineering course learning. The course covers a diverse topics ranging from basic nuclear physics concepts related to nuclear fissions, nuclear reactor systems and its revolution, fuel cycle and management, nuclear reactor analysis and design, reactor transients and controls, nuclear reactor thermal-hydraulic systems and mass/heat transfer analysis, and nuclear reactor safety and lessons from past accidents. Students will gain a thorough overall picture of nuclear engineering area and learn from scratch step by step how nuclear engineers start with the discovery of nuclear fission to build a real nuclear energy system. How mathematical models help quantitatively predict the behavior of the designed nuclear system and what engineering complications have to be considered will be learned from this course. The course content is divided into three parts (1) Fundamental Nuclear Physics, (2) Nuclear Reactor System and Theory, and (3) Nuclear Reactor Dynamics, Heat Transfer and Safety.

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MANE-2830, Nuclear Phenomena for Engineering Application

Offered: Spring 2009
(4 credits)
Course Description: This is a required course in nuclear engineering program offered at the second semester in sophomore year. This course surveys atomic and nuclear phenomena, their applications, and implications. To achieve this, the course is presented in three units: I. Particle collision mechanics, special relativity, particle-wave duality, and atomic quantum mechanics. II. Nuclear structure, characteristics, and reactions: structures, forces, decay mechanics, reaction mechanics, and interaction probabilities at the nuclear level. III. Applications and implications of nuclear phenomena: radiation effects on materials and biological systems, radiation shielding, radioisotope production, radiation detection, radiation sources, fission energy, and fusion energy.

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MANE-4380/4390, Senior Design Project I/II

    Course Description
  • Fall 2008-Spring 2009, Project: Modeling and Neutronic Analysis of Stochastic Distribution of Fuel Particles in Pebble-bed Design for Very High Temperature Gas-cooled Reactors.
  • Fall 2010-Spring 2011, Project: Full Core Pebble Flow Simulation and Neutronic Analysis for Pebble-bed Nuclear Reactor Designs. (Best Project Award)
  • Fall 2012-Spring 2013, Project: Optimization of Reactor Core Design for Light Water Reactors Loaded with TRISO Particle Fuels.
  • Fall 2013-Spring 2014, Project: Light Water Reactor Designs Loaded with Fully Ceramic Micro-encapsulated (FCM) Fuel.
  • Fall 2014-Spring 2015, Project: Surface Nuclear Energy System Design for Mars Mission. (Best Project Award)
  • Fall 2015-Spring 2016, Project: Human Nuclear Electric Propulsion Mission to Mars and Beyond. (Best Project Award)
  • Fall 2016-Spring 2017, Project: Europa Ice Melting Reactor.

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MANE-4964, Introduction to Radiation Transport Methods

Offered: Spring 2013, 2015, 2016
(3 credits)
Course Description: The broad goal of this course is to introduce students to basic methods that are used for simulating radiation transport processes, encountered in nuclear engineering. Radiation transport computation plays important roles in the design of new reactors, evaluation of radiation dose in medical physics, and the understanding of radiation interactions with materials. This introduction course will present the foundations of numerical (deterministic) and Monte Carlo methods that are widely used in the modeling and simulation of nuclear reactor design, radiation dosimetry, and radiation shielding. Some theoretical properties of the underlying transport and diffusion equations will also be developed, but only if they relate directly to computational methods. Emphasis will be placed on the three fundamental aspects of computation methods: (i) discretization methods for the transport and diffusion equations; (ii) iterative methods for solving the system of discretized equations; and (iii) Monte Carlo methods for solving general fixed-source and eigenvalue problems. A practical goal of the course is to provide students with a working knowledge of computational methods for deterministic and Monte Carlo simulations of 1-D transport problems. Students who wish to pursue this topic for more realistic (multidimensional) problems will receive the necessary background in this course.

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MANE-6290, Radiation Transport Methods

Offered: Fall 2008, Spring 2011, 2016
(3 credits)
Course Description: The broad goal of this course is to introduce the theoretical foundations of deterministic and Monte Carlo methods for solving radiation particle (neutron, photo, electron and ion) transport problems. The course covers a diverse of topics from fundamental nuclear physics and reactions, mathematical model and derivations for transport phenomena, to state-of-art methodologies in solving transport problems for neutron, photo, electron and ion. Typical topics include Boltzmann transport equation derivation, multi-group approximation, Pn/Sn methods, asymptotic analysis, integral transport methods, Monte Carlo simulation, Molecular Dynamics and Kinetic Monte Carlo methods, which relate directly to computational methods. A practical goal of the course is to provide students with a working knowledge of calculation methods for deterministic and Monte Carlo simulations of transport problems and receive the necessary background for future research in radiation transport computation areas.

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MANE-6280, Nuclear Reactor Analysis II

Offered: Spring 2016, 2017
(3 credits)
Course Description: The broad goal of this course is to prepare students with basic understanding of nuclear reactor analysis principles and state-of-the-art techniques/methodologies used in modern nuclear reactor analysis codes. Topics covered in this course include: multigroup diffusion equation for full core analysis, few-group cross section generation, fine group spectrum calculation, neutron slowing down and thermalization analysis, resonance absorption treatment, spectral and spatial homogenization techniques, solution methods of transport and diffusion equations, reactor kinetics models and analysis, coupled neutronic and thermal-hydraulic analysis with temperature feedback

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MANE-6300, Numerical Methods in Reactor Analysis

Offered: Spring 2010, 2012
(3 credits)
Course Description: The broad goal of this course is to introduce the theoretical foundations and pragmatic implementations of numerical methods used in nuclear reactor analysis. It mainly focuses on solving linear Boltzmann transport equation to support reactor core design and neutronic analysis. The course covers a diverse of topics from fundamental numerical computing theory, discretization schemes in converting continuous equations to discrete system of equations, numerical computing strategies to solve discrete equations, to state-of-art techniques in speeding up numerical methods and convergence analysis. Typical topics include Boltzmann transport equation derivation; discretization schemes over time, energy, solid angle and space; source iteration and Fourier analysis; rebalance acceleration including fine mesh rebalance and coarse mesh rebalance; "inconsistent" and "consistent" diffusion synthetic acceleration; quasi-diffusion methods and second moments Methods. A practical goal of the course is to provide students with a working knowledge of numerical computing methods in performing reactor core neutronic analysis and receive the necessary background for future research in applying numerical methods to solving nuclear reactor analysis problems.

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NEWA Blended Nuclear Reactor Course with Online Distance Learning Capability

To be offered. Now it is being offered at the United States Military Academy.
(3 credits)
Course Description: This is a blended course for local and distance learning which includes "hands-on" modules. The course package includes several laboratory sessions that will be interactively delivered from the Rensselaer Polytechnic Institute (RPI) reactor facility and the RPI Linear accelerator. It is packaged by combining several modules that include theoretical components and laboratory components. The hands-on experience could be delivered to other universities and organizations that do not have such facilities. The proposed interactive mode is aimed to provide the student with the best possible experience for a remotely delivered hands-on course. The teaching framework developed for this course can be expanded to include other modules and to allow remote instrumentation control through the web.

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Last updated on September 2015