NameLouis Dubois
Birth27 Oct 1626, Wicres, La Barree, French Flanders, France
Deathabt 23 Jun 1696, New Paltz, New York Colony
FatherChretien Maxmillan Dubois (1597-1655)
MotherCornelia
Misc. Notes

Louis served in the 2nd Esopus War and was the leader of New Paltz, New York, Patentees. Louis fled from his home in France to Mannheim, Germany before 1650. Louis was a Huguenot and fled France to avoid religious persecution. He and his family came to Kingston, New York in 1660. They then moved to Hurley, New York in the same colony as Kingston. The name DuBois was also spelled duBois. The wife and three children of Louis, where taken captive by the Esopus Indians in the massacre of June 7, 1663. They were rescued after three months in captivity in the Shawangunk Mountains, by an expedition commanded by Captain Martin Greiger. Catherine DuBois was singing the 137th Psalms, that of Babylonian captivity, when rescued. Captain Greiger, in his journal of the Second Esopus War, states that, Louis DuBois while working in his field, was attacked by three Indians, and although wounded and unarmed, slew one of the Indians with a piece of palisade, whereupon the others fled. Louis DuBois was appointed Magistrate of Hurley, N.Y. on August 10, 1669 by Governor Francis Lovelace. The site of New Paltz, N.Y. was bought from the Esopus Indians on September 15, 1677 by Louis DuBois. A patent was therefore granted the "Twelve Patentees" by Governor Edmond Andross, September 29, 1677. Louis DuBois was chosen Elder of the French Church at New Paltz when Rev. Pierre Daille visited there. In 1686, Louis DuBois returned from New Paltz to Kingston where he purchased a house and lived at this location ten years until his death in 1696. The vast real property holdings in New Paltz were divided among his children.

The following article was copied from the New Paltz, New York Home Page

Louis DuBois was born on October 28, 1626, in Wicres France (near Lille). He came to America with his wife Catherine
Blanchan in 1660. He first settled in Kingston, then New Paltz, where he was one of the founders and sat upon the Duzine, the
governing body. His grandson Daniel built the DuBois Fort which still stands today on Huguenot Street in New Paltz. Little is
actually known of his mother and father, though there is much speculation. His fathers name was Chrietien and his mother
(while not proven) is suspected to be Cornelia. His brothers and sisters were Francoise, Jacques and Anne. Louis returned to
Kingston where he died in June 23, 1696. There is a memorial to him in the Dutch Reformed Churchyard, right across from the
Post Office. His actual burial place is unknown, but it is somewhere on the Churchyards grounds.

The Data on the Descendents Louis DuBois came from research done by Major Louis DuBois.

1- Wicres, France Church records, 2- Mannheim, Germany Church Records, 3- Old Dutch Church, Kingston, New York, 4-
New Paltz, New York records, 5-Reformed Church of Manhattan, New York, 6- Barant DuBois bible records, Salem County,
New Jersey Historical Society, 7- Record of the family of Louis DuBois, Robert Paterson DuBois, and William Ewing DuBois,
1860, 8- Bicentennial DuBois Reunion, New Paltz, N.Y., 9- Nieukirk Family Genealogy, 1934, 10- General data, Cumberland
City, New Jersey, and 10- Michalin Map 51, Boulogne-Little French and European Publications 610 Fifth Ave., New York,
New York. Per Stew Willoughby <wets@@nconline.com>, "Louis served in the 2nd Esopus War and was the leader of New
Paltz, New York, Patentees. Louis fled from his home in France to Mannheim, Germany before 1650. Louis was a Huguenot
and fled France to avoid religious persecution. He and his family came to Kingston, New York in 1660. They then moved to
Hurley, New York in the same colony as Kingston. The name DuBois was also spelled duBois. The wife and three children of
Louis, where taken captive by the Esopus Indians in the massacre of June 7, 1663. They were rescued after three months in
captivity in the Shawangunk Mountains, by an expedition commanded by Captain Martin Greiger. Catherine DuBois was
singing the 137th Psalms, that of Babylonian captivity, when rescued. Captain Greiger, in his journal of the Second Esopus
War, states that, Louis DuBois while working in his field, was attacked by three Indians, and although wounded and unarmed,
slew one of the Indians with a piece of palisade, whereupon the others fled. Louis DuBois was appointed Magistrate of Hurley,
N.Y. on August 10, 1669 by Governor Francis Lovelace. The site of New Paltz, N.Y. was bought from the Esopus Indians on
September 15, 1677 by Louis DuBois. A patent was therefore granted the "Twelve Patentees" by Governor Edmond Andross,
September 29, 1677. Louis DuBois was chosen Elder of the French Church at New Paltz when Rev. Pierre Daille visited there.
In 1686, Louis DuBois returned from New Paltz to Kingston where he purchased a house and lived at this location ten years
until his death in 1696. The vast real property holdings in New Paltz were divided among his children.

The following article was copied from the New Paltz, New York Home Page

Louis DuBois was born on October 28, 1626, in Wicres France (near Lille). He came to America with his wife Catherine
Blanchan in 1660. He first settled in Kingston, then New Paltz, where he was one of the founders and sat upon the Duzine, the
governing body. His grandson Daniel built the DuBois Fort which still stands today on Huguenot Street in New Paltz. Little is
actually known of his mother and father, though there is much speculation. His fathers name was Chrietien and his mother
(while not proven) is suspected to be Cornelia. His brothers and sisters were Francoise, Jacques and Anne. Louis returned to
Kingston where he died in June 23, 1696. There is a memorial to him in the Dutch Reformed Churchyard, right across from the
Post Office. His actual burial place is unknown, but it is somewhere on the Churchyards grounds.

The Data on the Descendents Louis DuBois came from research done by Major Louis DuBois.

1- Wicres, France Church records, 2- Mannheim, Germany Church Records, 3- Old Dutch Church, Kingston, New York, 4- New Paltz, New York records, 5-Reformed Church of Manhattan, New York, 6- Barant DuBois bible records, Salem County, New Jersey Historical Society, 7- Record of the family of Louis DuBois, Robert Paterson DuBois, and William Ewing DuBois, 1860, 8- Bicentennial DuBois Reunion, New Paltz, N.Y., 9- Nieukirk Family Genealogy, 1934, 10- General data, Cumberland City, New Jersey, and 10- Michalin Map 51, Boulogne-Little French and European Publications 610 Fifth Ave., New York, New York."






The two eldest children of Louis du Bois were born in Mannheim; and in
1660 the family came to America. Upon their arrival here they proceeded
to New Village [New Pals] in Ulster Co., N. Y., where Louis rapidly rose
to prominence in local civil and religious affairs. He, with two of his
sons, were among the "twelve patentees" of New Paltz, receiving the grant
from Governor Andross, September 6, 1677. Louis was also a member of the
first Court of Sessions held at Kingston, the seat of Ulster County. He
led in demanding of the English government, and of the Assembly, that
there should be no taxation without the consent of the people, and for
this daring attitude he lost his commission. [MacKenzie's "Col. Families
of U. S.," VII., p. 472.] Thus anticipating the crisis of 1776!

In 1663, Louis du Bois headed an expedition against the Minnisink
Indians, and was of the colonial forces against them again in 1670.
[Index of Ancestors, Year-Book of Colonial Wars, 1922.] The first-named
punitive expedition of June 7, 1663, was known in New York history as the
Eusopus War. It was organized at the time the settlement was attacked by
the Minnisinks, who burned Hurley, killed and injured some of the
settlers, and carried away as prisoners, the wife of Louis du Bois, his
three children, and at least two of Jan Joosten's. These were taken to
the fastnesses of the Catskill Mountains and there remained in captivity
for months, but were rescued on the eve of torture by du Bois and Captain
Martin Kreiger's company of Manhattan soldiers; the trainband finally
rounded up the Indians and defeated them on September 3, 1663. In
connection with this tragic experience the following statement is
quoted: "About ten weeks after the capture of the women and children,
the Indians decided to celebrate their own escape from pursuit by burning
some of their victims and the ones selected were Catherine du Bois, and
her baby Sara, who afterward married her companion in captivity, John Van
Metre. A cubical pile of logs was arranged and the mother and child
placed thereon; when the Indians were about to apply the torch, Catherine
began to sing the 137th Psalm as a death chant. The Indians withheld the
fire and gave her respite while they listened; when she had finished they
demanded more, and before she had finished the last one her husband and
the Dutch soldiers from New Amsterdam arrived and surrounded the savages,
killed and captured some, and otherwise inflicted terrible punishment
upon them, and released the prisoners."[Martin Kreiger's
Journal.][MacKenzie's Col. Fam. U. S., VII., p. 472.] Louis du Bois was
one of the founders, and the first elder, of the Reformed Dutch Church at
New Paltz. He often officiated at the marriage
ceremonies and baptisms among the families connected with the church, and
with many enterprises of civic importance and progress his name was
frequently mentioned. After his death, in 1695, his widow married Jean
Cotton and their three children left numerous descendants, one of whom,
Garrett A. Hobart, was the Vice- President of the United States during
President McKinley's first administration.




Ref: Le Fevre, Ralph. History of New Paltz, New York and its old families (from 1678 to 1820): including the Huguenot pioneers and others who settled New Paltz previous to the revolution: with an appendix bringing down the history of certain families and some other matter to 1850. Albany, N.Y.: Fort Orange Press, Brandon Print. Co., 1909. (pg 510)
Spouses
Birth17 Oct 1627, Nouvelle-LeConte, Artois, France
Death10 Dec 1713, Kingston, New York
FatherMattys Blanchan (>1615-1688)
MotherMadeline Brissen Jorisse (1611-~1689)
Marriage10 Oct 1655, French Protestent Church, Manheim, Germany
ChildrenJacob (1661-1745)
Last Modified 26 May 2012Created 4 Sep 2012 using Reunion for Macintosh